Top 10 Android Libraries For Every Android Developer – 2020

That’s why we’ve decided it’s time for an updated list of the ultimate Android libraries. As you know, in the fast-paced field of software development, things change and evolve at lightning speed. Here in Top 10 Android Libraries Every Android Developer – 2020 you’ll find most useful and important libraries for android development.

We’ll kick off with one of the oldest, and I’d argue, one of the most useful Android libraries. Without further ado, let’s jump right into our list.

Here Is Top 10 Android Libraries For Every Android List

10. Dagger – Top 10 Android For Libraries Every Android

dagger android

Here in Top 10 Android Libraries, Every Android The List Begin With Dagger, Dagger is a fully static, compile-time dependency injection framework. Similar to RxJava, Dagger is really hard to understand (it took me a while to understand their CoffeeMaker example) but completely worth your time and effort.

When developing larger applications, you don’t want to handle dependency injection yourself because the code will grow quickly and become extremely difficult to maintain. Without Dagger, our Top 10 libraries list would be incomplete. Dagger helps you avoid this because it creates your dependency injection graph in compile-time via annotation processing.

9. Android KTX – Top 10 Android Libraries For Every Android

android KTX
Android KTX is a set of Kotlin extensions that wraps Android API, making it more user-friendly.

It adds a lot of methods and cool new features of Kotlin, such as named parameters, lambdas, and default parameter values.

Android KTX features a lot of extension functions, and the only way to learn about them is by digging through library code to see how they improved Android API. Android KTX is a set of Kotlin extensions that wraps Android API, making it more user-friendly. The whole purpose of this library is to make Android API more pleasant to use. This library changes the way we consume Android API—and for that reason, it should become the core of every Android application written in Kotlin.

8. RxJava – Top 10 Android Libraries For Every Android

rxjava
RxJava is a Java implementation of ReactiveX API that allows you to chain asynchronous tasks and events into observable sequences.

Here in Top 10 Android Libraries, Every Android The Useful Library is RxJava, RxJava is a Java implementation of ReactiveX API that allows you to chain asynchronous tasks and events into observable sequences. That’s where RxJava can help.

When fetching real-time data, it becomes extremely difficult to merge multiple API calls, switch threads and handle errors. In other words, they want to see the data updated automatically. Users expect modern applications to display data in real-time. This is where RxJava shines, and it is the reason why we started using this library. I will admit that RxJava is confusing and hard to learn, but it is completely worth your time. Together with Kotlin, the API is even better thanks to the additional extension functions. Even after we switched to Kotlin, we continued to use RxJava because of its benefits.

7. Room – Top 10 Android Libraries For Every Android

room android

Room is an official Android ORM, and there are multiple reasons for that status. This library features a beautiful API that is similar to Retrofit. The main benefit Room offers over other ORMs is its simplicity. Other ORMs come with much more complex APIs that require you to read all the documentation thoroughly before you can use them. It also relies heavily on annotations and standard SQL syntax.

Additionally, Room includes out of the box support for Rx and “LiveData,” so you can decide to use it however you like. Thanks to its standard SQL syntax, Room is incredibly easy to understand, allowing you to dive in without spending hours reading the documentation.

6. Timber – Top 10 Android Libraries For Every Android

timber
Timber is one of the core libraries we use on almost all our Android projects.

It also offers nice support for logging formatted strings and exceptions. Timber is a powerful, yet simple, the logging library built on top of the Android “Log” class. It allows you to easily turn to log on or off. Because of all these benefits, Timber is one of the core libraries we use on almost all our Android projects.

5. ThreeTen

threeten

However, if you are starting a new project, I strongly suggest you try out ThreeTen instead. ThreeTen is a date and time handling library for Android. We love this library because the standard Android Calendar API is a nightmare to work with.

ThreeTen is much smaller than JodaTime in terms of method count and binary size. Its API is also more concise than JodaTime’s API. It is a backport of JSR-310, which was included in Java 8 as a standard “java.time.*” package. If you are currently using JodaTime, it is probably not worth the switch to ThreeTen.

4. Glide

glide android
Glide is an image loading library that exposes a nice API, allowing you to transform your image however you want.

As you probably know by now, Android image loading and handling API is terrible. It’s a nightmare to even resize an image without getting “OutOfMemoryException.” Glide is an image loading library that exposes a nice API, allowing you to transform your image however you want.

This library allows you to easily load a remote image into your ImageView, define fallback images, cache and scale your images and much more. Try accomplishing all this without Glide, and you will quickly understand why this has become our core library. It even supports some common transformations like a circular image out of the box.

3. Chuck

chuck android
Chuck is an HTTP inspector for Android that allows you to dig into your application’s HTTP history on your mobile phone.

That’s because your HTTP history persists even if the app is killed, while logcat sometimes cleans itself after the app is restarted. This library is also sometimes more useful than logcat. When you use Chuck, your quality assurance team will applaud you as they will be able to see whether an issue persists on Android or the backend side. Chuck is an HTTP inspector for Android that allows you to dig into your application’s HTTP history on your mobile phone. The HTTP log is displayed as a notification, which you can expand to open full Chuck UI.

2. Moshi

moshi android
Moshi is a library that converts JSON into Java and Kotlin models.

Retrofit also has support for Moshi, and it all just clicks together. Moshi is a library that converts JSON into Java and Kotlin models. This library is superior to GSON in several aspects: it’s faster, it includes Kotlin support, it’s maintained, it throws predictable exceptions and it doesn’t use broken DateTime adapter by default. Plus, converting JSON to Java model (and vice-versa) is straightforward with Moshi.

We also admire Moshi for its JSON API support. A lot of people refer to the Moshi as GSON 3.0. Moshi JSON API makes our life easier because it converts JSON API response into meaningful Java objects. JSON API is the specification for building APIs, and lot of APIs we work with are written using that specification.

1. Retrofit

retorfit android
Retrofit is a type-safe HTTP client that allows you to define your REST API as an interface.

Top 10 Android Libraries Every Android List Ends Here, If you are using Rx, this module returns your API call as an Observable so you are able to chain it with the rest of your application. These are just a few of the many reasons we at Infinium still love and use Retrofit. Retrofit also allows synchronous and asynchronous API calls execution.

To top it off, Retrofit offers a separate Rx module. Retrofit is a type-safe HTTP client that allows you to define your REST API as an interface. You can manipulate the API requests’ body, headers, query parameters and much more via annotations, which makes everything clean and simple.

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